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Tabr is a RAM-saving Chrome tab manager

08 December 2015, Mike Williams

TabrChrome’s a great browser, but open too many tabs and it can turn into a real resource hog, grabbing vast amounts of RAM and maybe impacting your system’s performance.

Tabr is a new Chrome tab manager which helps you deal with this, by providing new ways to browse, archive and control your browser tabs.

The Tabr window opens with super-sized thumbnails of all your open tabs, in every Chrome window. You can scroll and click whatever you need, or use a Search box to search on title bar text.

Alternatively, if you can’t find what you want because your tabs are split across several Chrome windows, a “Combine Windows” button brings them all together.

Tabr

Browse, open, close or archive your tabs from their super-sized thumbnails

Hovering your mouse over a thumbnail displays an “Archive Tab” option, which saves the state of that tab, and closes it, freeing up RAM.

Tap “All Sessions” later, whatever you saved last will be at the top of the list, and you can restore it with a click.

If that’s too much hassle then you could try enabling the Auto-Archive feature, which automatically archives tabs after they’ve been idle for a specified number of minutes.

There’s also a more general “Archive Session” feature, which saves the state of every open tab, making it easy to restore everything later and carry on where you left off.

Tabr doesn’t quite have the functionality of some of the competition. It saves tabs rather than suspend them, for instance, and it’s not very configurable. (You don’t like the large thumbnails? Tough.)

The extension is looking good for a first release, though, with more than enough power to be useful, and a solid 4 star rating on Google Play. If you’re interested in tab managers when we’d give it a try.

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